Susan Meyer

36 Worth Avenue, Hudson

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Artist Statement

I make sculptures and installations exploring landscape, architecture, and the utopian instinct. Creating the work involves traditional and digital sculptural and drawing techniques. Sometimes I integrate small videos into the overall work. The finished pieces often resemble glistening or ruinous futuristic architectural models. Suggesting tensions between nature and construct, and between the individual and community, the works explore a sense of disconnect between a positivist, modernist stance and the byproduct of that stance, a looming sense of unease with the less than positive results.

Experimental communities influence the work; they epitomize our best and worst instincts colliding. Drop City, was an early (1965) commune in Trinidad, Colorado. At the trash yard, Droppers would use axes to cut out car hoods for their geodesic domes. Given a Dymaxion Award by Buckminster Fuller in ’67, Drop City was abandoned by the early ‘70s. Several of my pieces suggest the forms and palettes of Drop City, and of Modernist architecture and design, with elements of discord.

Asian scholar’s stones, objects of psychic transport, are also an inspiration, particularly for the smaller sculptures included within Plinth and Venus. For several of these recent pieces, I begin with small, doodle- like, two-dimensional sketches. In the studio, I cut and join wood, closely following the sketches, reconstructing them as three-dimensional forms. I am interested in the idea of translation here – in loosely drawing tiny images that bear little relation to the physical world, and then trying to make them both big and “real.”

susantmeyer@mac.com
518-965-5504

Susan Meyer

36 Worth Ave, Hudson

click images    

Artist Statement

I make sculptures and installations exploring landscape, architecture, and the utopian instinct. Creating the work involves traditional and digital sculptural and drawing techniques. Sometimes I integrate small videos into the overall work. The finished pieces often resemble glistening or ruinous futuristic architectural models. Suggesting tensions between nature and construct, and between the individual and community, the works explore a sense of disconnect between a positivist, modernist stance and the byproduct of that stance, a looming sense of unease with the less than positive results. Experimental communities influence the work; they epitomize our best and worst instincts colliding. Drop City, was an early (1965) commune in Trinidad, Colorado. At the trash yard, Droppers would use axes to cut out car hoods for their geodesic domes. Given a Dymaxion Award by Buckminster Fuller in ’67, Drop City was abandoned by the early ‘70s. Several of my pieces suggest the forms and palettes of Drop City, and of Modernist architecture and design, with elements of discord. Asian scholar’s stones, objects of psychic transport, are also an inspiration, particularly for the smaller sculptures included within Plinth and Venus. For several of these recent pieces, I begin with small, doodle- like, two-dimensional sketches. In the studio, I cut and join wood, closely following the sketches, reconstructing them as three-dimensional forms. I am interested in the idea of translation here – in loosely drawing tiny images that bear little relation to the physical world, and then trying to make them both big and “real.”

susantmeyer@mac.com 518-965-5504