Stuart Farmery

40 8th Street, Hudson

Click Images

Artist Statement

I always remember, as a student, not liking Brancusi!
Too simple, too shiny, too smooth!
Of course he soon became one of my many Gods joining Joseph Beuys,
Richard Long, Claes Oldenburg, Eva Hesse, Bruce McLean and Richard Tuttle who were some of my many early influences. Each one heavily involved with their landscape. Likewise musicians from Soft Machine to John Coltrane have always been an essential mainstay for me. Their forms, spacing and color so necessary to us and our sanity. It’s sadly a mainly male roster but has changed since moving to the Hudson Valley. Phyllidia Barlow now being the reigning Queen but also the many superb female artists that are living here.

It wasn’t until much later that I realised the relevance and brilliance of the British comedian Tommy Cooper’s philosophy – Not Like That, Like This.

Born British and schooled in London – though always with an eye on American art, I moved to NYC in 1980. The differences between the two cultures, their histories, attitudes and language constantly fascinate me.

In my work time lines are created.
By putting disparate forms together I question their scale, order and color. Putting larger things on top of smaller things can argue their stability and preconceived notions of order.
A live deer standing inside of a raised flower bed.
There is a distance between forms and their landscape.
As with our personal relationships that are constantly effecting and redirecting us. Color, in my work, is essential as it greatly effects visual volume, dominance and vibrancy.
Different materials query weight, strength, texture and balance along with a futile quest for permanence.

In the studio and after many serious conversations with my sculptures I don’t know which one of us is pulling the others leg. It’s a serious matter.
I strive to be like my cat. A perfect bit of imperfection.

stuartfarmery2@gmail.com
518-392-0183

Stuart Farmery

40 8th Street

Click Images

Artist Statement

I always remember, as a student, not liking Brancusi!
Too simple, too shiny, too smooth!
Of course he soon became one of my many Gods joining Joseph Beuys,
Richard Long, Claes Oldenburg, Eva Hesse, Bruce McLean and Richard Tuttle who were some of my many early influences. Each one heavily involved with their landscape. Likewise musicians from Soft Machine to John Coltrane have always been an essential mainstay for me. Their forms, spacing and color so necessary to us and our sanity. It’s sadly a mainly male roster but has changed since moving to the Hudson Valley. Phyllidia Barlow now being the reigning Queen but also the many superb female artists that are living here.

It wasn’t until much later that I realised the relevance and brilliance of the British comedian Tommy Cooper’s philosophy – Not Like That, Like This.

Born British and schooled in London – though always with an eye on American art, I moved to NYC in 1980. The differences between the two cultures, their histories, attitudes and language constantly fascinate me.

In my work time lines are created.
By putting disparate forms together I question their scale, order and color. Putting larger things on top of smaller things can argue their stability and preconceived notions of order.
A live deer standing inside of a raised flower bed.
There is a distance between forms and their landscape.
As with our personal relationships that are constantly effecting and redirecting us. Color, in my work, is essential as it greatly effects visual volume, dominance and vibrancy.
Different materials query weight, strength, texture and balance along with a futile quest for permanence.

In the studio and after many serious conversations with my sculptures I don’t know which one of us is pulling the others leg. It’s a serious matter.
I strive to be like my cat. A perfect bit of imperfection.

stuartfarmery2@gmail.com
518-392-0183